Diabetes and Sleep Apnea–Increasing Evidence of a Link

Here’s hoping you’ve recovered from Thursdays’ turkey debauchery!

 

November is National Diabetes Month, and as we wrap up the month I want to bring to your attention an article recently published in the Huffington Post regarding diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea.  Recent published literature demonstrates that up to 7 out of 10 diabetic people have sleep apnea.  Those are astounding numbers considering how many people are diabetic in the United States.

Rather than repeat the contents of the article (written by my academy’s president, Tim Morgenthaler), I’m providing the link to it here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/timothy-morgenthaler-md/type-2-diabetics-get-eval_b_6214504.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000030

There are many reasons to be concerned about this connection.  First, obstructive sleep apnea is still a very under-recognized, under-diagnosed problem.  Epidemiologic studies show that out of the millions of Americans with sleep apnea, only about 15% have been diagnosed!  Second, there is increasing evidence that sleep apnea affects metabolism and weight more deeply and in more ways than originally thought.  Finally, both sleep apnea and diabetes are risk factors for the development of heart disease, such as heart failure, early heart attack, atherosclerotic disease, and rhythm abnormalities.

Diagnosing and treating sleep apnea early have the potential of making the sleep apnea patient feel MUCH BETTER and more awake and alert during the day, but among the fringe benefits are that the SNORING STOPS and hopefully there may be a REDUCTION IN RISK for cardiac disease.  I can’t underscore enough how important it is to seek medical help if you’re chronically sleepy during the day, snoring substantially at night, and having breathing pauses or choking or gasping events during your sleep.

Some of my readers may know that I’m back in school, which is why I’ve not been writing as much recently.  However, winter break will soon be here, and I will write more on the topic of sleep deprivation in the near future.  I wish you and yours’ a most peaceful (and snore-free) holiday season!

Advertisements